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Ant Control

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With ants being the #1 nuisance pest in the United States, ant control is now more important than ever. There are more than 700 ant species found in the U.S., although only about 25 species commonly infest homes. Ants are social insects that typically live in underground colonies, made up of workers and a queen. Ants will eat practically any kind of food, but are especially attracted to sweets. Ants are easily identifiable due to their three distinct body region: head, thorax and abdomen, as well as antennae.

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Bed Bug Control

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The common bed bug (Cimex lectularius Linnaeus 1758) is an ectoparisite insect (a parasite which lives on the outside of the body of the host) of the family Cimicidae. Bed bugs feed only on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded hosts. Although they have a cryptic behavior and can conceal themselves in tight cracks and crevices, bed bugs are often found in bed parts, such as mattresses and box springs, hence the common name.

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Cockroach Control

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Cockroach control and management are important for health and safety reasons. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) reports that one-in-five children in the United States have severe sensitivities to cockroach allergens, which increase the severity of asthma symptoms. These allergens are most commonly introduced in homes through cockroach saliva, droppings and the decomposing bodies of these pests.

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Flea and Tick Control

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Fleas are parasites that feed on the blood of any warm-blooded body. The most common species is the cat flea, which often feasts on cats, dogs and humans.

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Fly Control

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House flies do not bite, but are capable of transferring more than 100 pathogens, including malaria, salmonella and tuberculosis. They contaminate food and surfaces by spreading disease organisms picked up on the silla on their bodies and through their saliva that is used to break down foods. Food contamination is one of the main reasons that fly pest control is so important.

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Rodent Control

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Rodents can enter a building through almost any opening or crack. It is important to inspect for rodent droppings, especially in undisturbed areas such as pantries, under baseboards and along walls. Rodent droppings most often cause allergic reactions in human beings but can also cause disease, including the potentially deadly Hantavirus. More frequently, though, rodents serve as vectors, carrying bacteria, such as salmonella, on their bodies and contaminating food sources, kitchen surfaces and equipment. A pest control professional can offer the expertise and knowledge of rodent biology to best protect your health and rid your home of a rodent infestation.

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Termite Control

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The best method of subterranean termite control is to avoid water accumulation near your home's foundation. Divert water away with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks. Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation. Never bury wood scraps or waste lumber in the yard. Most importantly, eliminate wood contact with the soil. Maintain a one-inch gap between the soil and wood portions of the building.

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Wasp and Bee Control

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Stinging insects like bees send more than 500,000 people to the emergency room each year. They are especially active during the second half of summer when the colonies forage for food that will sustain their queens during the winter.

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Wildlife Control

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Bats, raccoons and skunks are frequent carriers of rabies, which is potentially fatal if left untreated. In fact, as many as 40,000 people each year in the United States are exposed to animals that might have rabies, and must receive preventive treatments. Rabies and other transmittable diseases are one of the primary reasons for proactive wildlife and animal control.

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